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Posts tagged with "American history"

thebrassglass:

For my research, I am examining the accounts of English-American settlers captured by Native Americans. Mary Jemison is probably the most famous account of a white woman who was captured by Native Americans and then eventually decided to stay among them.

"In 1753, fifteen year old Mary Jemison was captured by Indians along the Pennsylvania frontier during the Seven Years’ War between the French, English, and Indian peoples of North America. She was adopted and incorporated into the Senecas, a familiar practice among Iroquois and other Indian peoples seeking to replace a lost sibling or spouse. Mary married and raised a family in the decades before and after the American Revolution; many captives, once adopted and integrated into an Indian community, refused the opportunity to return home, finding life in Indian society more rewarding. In 1823 Mary Jemison related her life story to James Seaver, a doctor who lived near her home in western New York. Seaver’s story of “the white woman of the Genessee,” as she became known, sold over 100,000 copies in 1824."( http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5794/ )

You can still visit the cabin that belonged to Mary Jemison’s daughter in Letchworth State Park in southwestern New York State. (More about that here: http://www.letchworthparkhistory.com/jem.html )
This drawing was made with ballpoint pen, Prismacolor markers and Prismacolor colored pencils.

thebrassglass:

For my research, I am examining the accounts of English-American settlers captured by Native Americans. Mary Jemison is probably the most famous account of a white woman who was captured by Native Americans and then eventually decided to stay among them.

"In 1753, fifteen year old Mary Jemison was captured by Indians along the Pennsylvania frontier during the Seven Years’ War between the French, English, and Indian peoples of North America. She was adopted and incorporated into the Senecas, a familiar practice among Iroquois and other Indian peoples seeking to replace a lost sibling or spouse. Mary married and raised a family in the decades before and after the American Revolution; many captives, once adopted and integrated into an Indian community, refused the opportunity to return home, finding life in Indian society more rewarding. In 1823 Mary Jemison related her life story to James Seaver, a doctor who lived near her home in western New York. Seaver’s story of “the white woman of the Genessee,” as she became known, sold over 100,000 copies in 1824."
( http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5794/ )

You can still visit the cabin that belonged to Mary Jemison’s daughter in Letchworth State Park in southwestern New York State. (More about that here: http://www.letchworthparkhistory.com/jem.html )

This drawing was made with ballpoint pen, Prismacolor markers and Prismacolor colored pencils.



Hey, ladies. The next time some reenacting group tries to tell you that you have to wear skirts, that you can’t dress as men and fight in the war, just mention these bad-ass ladies and tell those reenactors to kindly shove it up their derrières.

Anne Hennis Trotter Bailey (upper picture): https://www.nwhm.org/education-resources/biography/biographies/ann-trotter-bailey/ and http://www.wvdar.org/AnneBailey/history.htm and http://madannebailey.blogspot.com/

Deborah Sampson (lower picture): http://gardenofpraise.com/ibdsamp.htm

Anna Maria Lane: http://www.revolutionary-war-and-beyond.com/anna-maria-lane-receives-revolutionary-war-veterans-pension.html

Tyonajanegen: http://aiwa.americanindiansource.com/nativewomenmilitary/nativewomenmilitary.html

More:

"Women and Combat: Why They Serve": http://scholars.unh.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1015&context=inquiry_2008

The Continental Line’s “Women Soldiers in the American Revolution”: http://www.continentalline.org/articles/article.php?date=0002&article=000202

Veterans of Foreign Wars’ “Women at War: From the Revolutionary War to the Present”: https://vfw.org/uploadedFiles/VFW.org/News_and_Events/vfw_women_at_war.pdf

And any time a historical site manager tries to tell you that camp followers are unwelcome because they are historically inaccurate, kindly reference the following and tell them to shove it up their derrière.

Colonial Williamsburg: http://www.history.org/history/teaching/enewsletter/volume7/nov08/women_revarmy.cfm

The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History: http://www.gilderlehrman.org/history-by-era/war-for-independence/essays/women-and-wagoners-camp-followers-american-war-for-indepe

Sons of Liberty Revolutionary War Archives: http://www.revolutionarywararchives.org/campfollow.html

In the Words of Women: http://inthewordsofwomen.com/?cat=34

Further reading: http://www.amazon.com/Belonging-Army-Followers-Community-Revolution/dp/1570033390

Mar 1

todayinhistory:

February 28th 1525: Cuauhtémoc executed

On this day in 1525, the Aztec ruler of Tenochtitlán Cuauhtémoc was executed by Hernán Cortés’s Spanish forces. Cuauhtémoc began his reign in 1520 soon after his relative Moctezuma II died in battle with the Spanish. Becoming ruler at the young age of 25, he came to power over a land besieged. He faced the threat of the Spanish invasion and a smallpox epidemic, and battled bravely to save Tenochtitlán. However Cuauhtémoc was captured on August 13th 1521, along with his family and most of the remaining Tenochtitlán nobles. The king asked Cortés to kill him, but the conquistador refused and initially let him go. However, lust for the fabled Aztec gold was too much, and Cortés’s forces eventually recaptured and tortured Cuauhtémoc to find its whereabouts. In 1525, Cortés ordered Cuauhtémoc executed for supposedly plotting to kill leading Spaniards, Cortés included. This claim has never been verified, but Cuauhtémoc is remembered in Mexico as a brave warrior who fought to save his country from the invaders.

Images of The War of 1812 on the Chesapeake 

The military conflict lasted 32 months and stemmed from American frustration with the impressment of American merchant sailors in the Royal Navy, Britain’s continuing war with France and support of American Indigenous tribes against the new nation. 

Imagine the fear a landowner on the Chesapeake Bay, most likely a farmer of sorts, must have felt one day seeing the sky disappear behind heavy white masts and the flag of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. 

thebrassglass:

History is alive and well in New York State. (And these represent only the forts I’ve been to so far.)

First picture: From a 1757 map of the Great Lakes. (http://www.mapsofpa.com/18thcentury/1757greatlakes.jpg)

Picture 1 - War of 1812 reenactment at the site of Fort la Presentation in Ogdensburg, N.Y.

Picture 2 - Civil War encampment/reenactment at Fort Ontario, near the site of Fort Oswego in Oswego, N.Y.

Picture 3: French and Indian War reenactment at Old Fort Niagara near Youngstown, N.Y.

Picture 4: Fort Stanwix National Monument, which sits near the site of Fort Bull in Rome, N.Y., as it would have looked during the American Revolution.