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Books for my Header by Khylee Berrett

Books for my Header by Khylee Berrett

(Source: bookporn)

cool-cool-considerate-men:

I don’t think I’ve ever come across this portrait of Laurens before.
It’s from the magazine Americana Illustrated, Vol. 30, No. 2
The small writing just under the portrait says, “C Fraser,” which gives us the artist, but I’m not sure what the word next to Fraser is.
The Latin says, “Pro patria non timidus mori,” which I think means something along the lines of, “Unafraid to die for his country.”  I don’t know a lot of Latin, but that’s what Google is telling me.  Feel free to correct me if I’m wrong.

cool-cool-considerate-men:

I don’t think I’ve ever come across this portrait of Laurens before.

It’s from the magazine Americana Illustrated, Vol. 30, No. 2

The small writing just under the portrait says, “C Fraser,” which gives us the artist, but I’m not sure what the word next to Fraser is.

The Latin says, “Pro patria non timidus mori,” which I think means something along the lines of, “Unafraid to die for his country.”  I don’t know a lot of Latin, but that’s what Google is telling me.  Feel free to correct me if I’m wrong.

(Source: lindkvist)

Scissors glasses (lorgnette)

Round lens, silver gilt French scissors lorgnette, ca 1750.

This type of eyewear was popular with European men and women in the late 18th century; both George Washington and Napoleon used them. The delicate design of this pair is typical of the French style.

(From a slideshow by the Texas Optometric Association; the source link will take you to the first image in the slideshow.)

While I do not know for certain what it looked like, in my mind this is the style of lorgnette that Philippe LeBas gave to Elisabeth Duplay. <3

(Source: texas.aoa.org)

history-in-pictures:

The guards carrying Elizabeth Petrovna to the Winter Palace on the night of 25 November 1741

history-in-pictures:

The guards carrying Elizabeth Petrovna to the Winter Palace on the night of 25 November 1741